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Kendo

Twenty years after the ancient Japanese samurai class was disbanded at the dawn of Japan’s Meiji Restoration (1866-1867), there was a resurgence of interest in traditional Japanese sword arts that led to the creation of kendo.

In 1886, the Japanese police began gathering forms from kenjutsu schools that were famous before the disbandment to develop a standard way of training in kenjutsu with the sword. By 1912, the controlling body for all martial arts in Japan, Dai Nippon Butoku Kai, introduced a standard core curriculum for the new “way of the sword, ” which was kendo.

Despite it’s shaky history, kendo has evolved into a sport with strong martial arts values in which the practitioner develops physical and mental discipline with an almost Zen-like oneness with his sword, no matter whether it’s a bamboo shinai, wooden bokken or steel katana.

The Korean version of kendo is called kumdo. Its name is written with the same two Chinese characters as kendo, and its techniques and rules are identical.

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  1. Master the 4 Inner Principles of Japanese Samurai Swordsmanship

    Master the 4 Inner Principles of Japanese Samurai Swordsmanship