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Hapkido

Hapkido is a Korean martial art that is written with the same three Chinese characters as aikido. Hapkido’s techniques, however, bear little resemblance to aikido’s. Although Choi Yong-sul is credited with founding hapkido, it’s probably more accurate to say that hapkido arose from a collaborative effort among a small group of Korean nationals (Ji Han-jae, Kim Moo-hong, Suh Bok-sub and Myung Jae-nam) following the period of Japanese colonialism in Korea.

Hapkido originally focused on pressure-point strikes, joint locks and throws, but now, thanks to the influence of hapkido expert Ji Han-jae, it also includes highly refined kicks and hand strikes. Various weapons are taught, including the cane (perhaps influenced by French savate), staff and belt. Development of the practitioner’s ki (life force) is also stressed. Hapkido, which doesn’t have any forms, is usually considered a self-defense style rather than a martial sport.

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  1. Hapkido Techniques vs. Roundhouse Kicks From Multiple Ranges

    Hapkido Techniques vs. Roundhouse Kicks From Multiple Ranges

    The roundhouse kick is one of the pillars of the martial arts. What if you find one flying at you? Han Woong Kim, son of hapkido luminary Chong S. Kim, shows you a series of effective counterattacks in these exclusive videos!
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  2. From Hapkido to Kuk Sool: Exploring Korea’s Martial Arts

    From Hapkido to Kuk Sool: Exploring Korea’s Martial Arts

    “Adults from abroad may have trouble keeping up with Korean martial artists, especially those who started training when they were kids — which pretty much includes everybody,” says our correspondent regarding training in Korea.
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  3. Hapkido: Can One Martial Art Function in All Four Ranges of Self-Defense? (Part 4)

    Hapkido: Can One Martial Art Function in All Four Ranges of Self-Defense? (Part 4)

    Many would argue that the Korean martial art of hapkido functions best at the closest distance of all — grappling range, where throws, chokes and joint locks become the dominant techniques. Find out what two veteran instructors think.
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  4. Hapkido: Can One Martial Art Function in All Four Ranges of Self-Defense? (Part 3)

    Hapkido: Can One Martial Art Function in All Four Ranges of Self-Defense? (Part 3)

    When you move inside kicking range and punching range, you enter trapping range. There, attacking arms get deflected and immobilized; and knees, elbows and head butts cut loose. Learn how Jang Mu Won Hapkido handles close-range combat.
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  5. Hapkido: Can One Martial Art Function in All Four Ranges of Self-Defense? (Part 2)

    Hapkido: Can One Martial Art Function in All Four Ranges of Self-Defense? (Part 2)

    Once they’re inside kicking range, where hand techniques usually take over, hapkido practitioners are quite capable of continuing to defend themselves. “Most of the punching we do is straight karate-style punching; beyond that is open-hand strikes,” said Stephen Petermann of Jang Mu Won Hapkido.
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  6. Hapkido: Can One Martial Art Function in All Four Ranges of Self-Defense? (Part 1)

    Hapkido: Can One Martial Art Function in All Four Ranges of Self-Defense? (Part 1)

    Practitioners of the Korean art of hapkido claim to be privileged to study a style famed for its powerful kicks, varied hand strikes, effective trapping-range techniques, and versatile joint locks and throws. Does it effectively cover all four ranges of combat?
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  7. Combat Hapkido’s John Pellegrini on Women’s Self-Defense, MMA and Military Training

    Combat Hapkido’s John Pellegrini on Women’s Self-Defense, MMA and Military Training

    To help us learn more about traditional training in a modern world, our friend GK Zachary from AdultMartialArtist.com sat down with combat-hapkido founder John Pellegrini.

    Pellegrini’s been inducted in more than 20 martial arts halls of fame and has been on the cover of 17 self-defense magazines, including our own. Why?
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  8. Hapkido Palm-to-Palm Wrist Hyperextension/Takedown

    Hapkido Palm-to-Palm Wrist Hyperextension/Takedown

    Steve Petermann, president of the Jang Mu Won Hapkido Association, trained under hapkido founder Chong S. Kim for more than 30 years. In this exclusive in-studio video, Petermann demonstrates a hapkido control technique involving a powerful wrist hyperextension and takedown.


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  9. Hapkido Z-Arm/S-Arm Wrist Lock to Takedown

    Hapkido Z-Arm/S-Arm Wrist Lock to Takedown

    Steve Petermann, president of the Jang Mu Won Hapkido Association, trained under hapkido founder Chong S. Kim for more than 30 years. In this exclusive in-studio video, Petermann demonstrates a hapkido control technique involving a powerful wrist lock capable of taking an opponent straight to the ground with minimal effort.


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  10. Combat-Hapkido Weapon Disarms With John Pellegrini

    Combat-Hapkido Weapon Disarms With John Pellegrini

    Combat-hapkido creator and Black Belt Hall of Fame member John Pellegrini is one of the world’s leading authorities on hand-to-hand combat. In this video, he demonstrates the combat-hapkido method for weapon disarms!


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