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Is Wing Chun Effective for Modern Self-Defense? Grandmaster William Cheung and Sifu Eric Oram Discuss Wing Chun Techniques and Wing Chun History!

Wing chun kung fu masters William Cheung and Eric Oram photographed for Black Belt magazine. Is wing chun effective for self-defense on the street? In this exclusive preview from the DVD Grandmaster Cheung’s Wing Chun Kung Fu, grandmaster William Cheung and Eric Oram discuss wing chun history and how wing chun techniques developed over time. The kung fu moves they demonstrate focus on what William Cheung calls “the fourth center” — namely, how trained wing chun fighters can dominate this zone for maximum control over their opponents.

WING CHUN KUNG FU VIDEO
William Cheung and Eric Oram on “The Fourth Center” in Modern Self-Defense


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“Before the wing chun system came along, [Chinese martial artists were] using three centers,” William Cheung explains. “You [would] protect your center, and then you [would] attack the opponent’s center, and [then there would be] the center of exchange. But when wing chun was developed, they said, ‘Ahhh. We’re doing a 1-2-3-4.’”

William Cheung proceeds to demonstrate the 1-2-3-4 sequence with a series of kung fu moves and explains a pivotal moment in wing chun history. “So they developed a fourth center,” the wing chun grandmaster explains. “When you throw a punch, then I can counterattack at the same time.”

Using his senior student, sifu Eric Oram, to demonstrate the role of the fourth center in wing chun techniques, William Cheung elaborates on how this development altered the course of wing chun history and elevated the art into an effective self-defense arsenal that is still popular today.

Eric Oram shows you how to fight someone bigger than you in this free wing chun kung fu techniques download published at BlackBeltMag.com by Black Belt magazine, the world's leading magazine of martial arts.“So when he comes along, I block. I’m facing this point here,” William Cheung explains, having moved around Eric Oram’s punching arm to the outside of his elbow — which William Cheung refers to as the third center, from which he can readily access an impact point on Eric Oram’s head. This would be the fourth center.

“I free up [my] other arm to do the counterattack — so I don’t need to deal with [his] other arm,” William Cheung explains, demonstrating a strike to Eric Oram’s head. “You’re using the fourth center to fight on the blind side.”

The quick and fluid motion of wing chun techniques in action allows for minute gaps of time during which an opponent’s arm, although being contacted by the defender, is still relatively free. Some may ask: Is wing chun effective for street fighting or other close-quarters encounters if the attacker’s arm is not secured, pinned, bent or impacted by severe pressure-point manipulation?


Related Martial Arts Books, E-Books,
DVDs and Video Downloads

Grandmaster Cheung’s
Wing Chun Kung Fu

Modern Wing Chun Kung Fu: A Practical Guide to Combat and Self-Defense

How to Develop
Chi Power


William Cheung addresses this concern, deconstructing wing chun techniques as applied to a simple attack/response scenario: “One of the strategies is to control the elbow, so the leverage can control the person’s balance. If [the attacker] throws a round punch, I face [the inside of his elbow] — the third center — [and his face becomes] the fourth center. I’m away from the free arm, [but] I’m controlling the blind side from the inside. And then I can still deal with [his other arm].”

So is wing chun effective for fighting opponents in “the real world?” Experience is the telltale answer. Share your thoughts with us in the comment fields below! Sign in and voice your opinion!


MORE KUNG FU ONLINE!

Check out these wing chun kung fu books and videos for a variety of awesome wing chun techniques from William Cheung and Eric Oram! Learn more and answer the question for yourself: Is wing chun effective for street-fighting self-defense?

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5 Responses

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  1. Rick says

    I’m not sure Kung Fu is applicable in a real street fight. I mean wasn’t that the whole purpose of Bruce Lee making Jeet Kune Do? But even though Bruce Lee was who he was, he was still only one man. I’ve read a story about a guy in a parking garage who successfully defended himself from getting stabbed in a parking garage by using Kung Fu. I believe if your a master student of anything you start to make it your own just like Bruce Lee did and use something like Kung Fu as the basis or foundation of your fighting system, taking away and adding to it.

    Rick Saxby,
    Publisher, FightingPhilosophy.com

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0
  2. Rob says

    Almost all martial arts one can think of (including and especially Wing Chun) are street fighting arts. Or, at least, they should be.

    Many kung fu styles were developed for armed combat, the military, and times of social unrest.

    In modern times, we’ve introduced competitive martial arts, sports martial arts, and martial arts as a path to health and meditation. This is great for variety, but it is not the original intent for studying martial arts…

    Kill your enemy, or be killed.

    It’s not pretty to think about, it’s probably not good for business if you run a school, but that’s why martial arts got their start in ancient times. Just ask the Spartans, the samurai, the countless military leaders from old Chinese dynasties, etc.

    Keep Wing Chun real!

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0
  3. Rob says

    Almost all martial arts one can think of (including and especially Wing Chun) are street fighting arts. Or, at least, they should be.

    Many kung fu styles were developed for armed combat, the military, and times of social unrest.

    In modern times, we’ve introduced competitive martial arts, sports martial arts, and martial arts as a path to health and meditation. This is great for variety, but it is not the original intent for studying martial arts…

    Kill your enemy, or be killed.

    It’s not pretty to think about, it’s probably not good for business if you run a school, but that’s why martial arts got their start in ancient times. Just ask the Spartans, the samurai, the countless military leaders from old Chinese dynasties, etc.

    Keep Wing Chun real!

    Rob WingChunLife.com

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

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  2. Is Wing Chun Effective for Modern Self-Defense? Grandmaster … | Martial Arts Organization linked to this post on February 2, 2012

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