Pencak

Travel with Black Belt to the region known in days passed as the Spice Islands and the Dutch East Indies — a string of islands stretching from Singapore to Australia — to learn about the Indonesian martial arts in this new FREE guide!

Pencak Silat: Techniques and History of the Indonesian Martial Arts

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Dear Pencak Silat Practitioner,

Sumatra, Java, Bali and a hundred other smaller islands … these are lands of mountains and green jungles, the dark heart of Joseph Conrad’s tales and the home of the Balinese temple dancers.

At one time, though, they were islands of violence — swept by the Japanese in World War II, racked by the struggle for independence from the Dutch and pummeled by years of internal civil war.

So it’s not surprising that the people of these islands developed some effective methods for combat and self-defense.

These fighting systems drew on boxing, wrestling and weaponry — and were practiced not only for physical defense but also for attainment of higher psychological ends.

In time, what had become a collection of Indonesian fighting systems became martial arts in their own right.

In this archival FREE Guide from BlackBeltMag.com — Pencak Silat: Techniques and History of the Indonesian Martial ArtsBlack Belt explores this rich subject matter through the eyes of two Dutch-Indonesian experts interviewed exclusively for its June 1965 issue, marking the publication’s first in-depth discussion of the topic.

Pencak Silat, Pentjak Silat, Bukulan — Are These All the Same?

Pencak Silat: Techniques and History of the Indonesian Martial Arts

In this new FREE download — Pencak Silat: Techniques and History of the Indonesian Martial Arts — two natives of the island of Java talk about their experience with the art they call bukulan. But “bukulan” is strictly an East Java term, covering the styles known collectively as pentjak and in the midlands as silat — often referred to collectively as pentjak silat and usually spelled today as pencak silat.

Confused? Get some clarity about this complex history in your FREE download!

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How Do Pencak Silat Techniques Function?

The pencak silat techniques described by the experts in Pencak Silat: Techniques and History of the Indonesian Martial Arts have the practitioners squaring off at a distance for a sort of “expanded boxing in which every part of the body is subject to be attacked and to be used for an attack.”

In this FREE archival story from Black Belt’s rich past — Pencak Silat: Techniques and History of the Indonesian Martial Arts — learn more about this full-body fighting form!

The “Kata” for Silat Techniques Conditioning Looks Like … Dancing?

Pencak Silat: Techniques and History of the Indonesian Martial Arts

As a matter of fact … yes!

Practitioners of silat techniques use their own form of kata as found in classical karate to develop reflexes and condition their bodies for combat.

Those not aware of the deadly connotations of these moves, however, might think the forms were Indonesian dancing rather than the formalized conditioning for fierce silat techniques.

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If “Pencak Silat” Describes a Collective of Styles, Just How Many Are There?

The list of martial arts falling under the heading of “pencak silat” is long indeed.

From the styles of bukulan and serak specialized in by the experts interviewed for Black Belt’s June 1965 exploration of silat techniques to the classical styles of tjemantik and tje bandar — and from the nerve-centric style of klilap to the sucker-punch style of suchi hati — the martial arts of Indonesia also employ the use of weapons such as the siku-siku (small fork), bedok (curved knife) and the wavy-bladed Malay kris.

Tiger, Snake, Mantis, Crane … Ape?!

Pencak Silat: Techniques and History of the Indonesian Martial Arts

In this FREE Guide — Pencak Silat: Techniques and History of the Indonesian Martial Arts — learn about tji monjet, or the “ape style” and how it got its name! (Hint: It comes from an unfortunate story of domestic violence. Sound strange? Get this FREE download and find out what it all means!)

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Access More Articles, Videos and Free Guides About Pencak Silat and More!

Along with your FREE download, you’ll also become a member of the Black Belt community and receive the following:

  • Six weekly emails with more articles and videos about silat techniques and the martial arts of Indonesia — plus contests, product announcements and special discounts!
  • The ability to share ideas with the Black Belt online community — accessible 24 hours a day, 365 days a year!
  • A FREE technique video every week from a variety of martial arts!

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Pencak Silat: Techniques and History of the Indonesian Martial Arts

Click on the button below and we’ll send you a link to download your FREE copy of Black Belt magazine’s earliest look at pencak silat techniques — presented uncut with original text, photos and layout!

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Train in the exotic for new perspectives on the mundane,

Raymond